Government Representatives Address ACCME Public Health Imperatives Forum

June 27, 2013
Posted by: 
Tamar Hosansky

Federal representatives discuss CME collaboration opportunities

Representatives from four federal government agencies participated in the “Public Health Imperatives Forum,” held during the ACCME’s April 2013 CME as a Bridge to Quality™ Accreditation Workshop. The first-time event featured representatives from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), and the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

In the first section of the two-part forum, the government representatives discussed how CME can be a strategic partner in addressing public health priorities. A breakout session followed, giving participants the opportunity to engage directly with the federal representatives about collaboration opportunities to address public health priorities.

Here are comments from the government presenters:

  •  "The forum was a terrific opportunity to work directly with leaders in the CME field. Having a chance to highlight important public health concerns which are best addressed through collaboration was outstanding." ‑Wilson Compton, MD, MPE, National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • “I enjoyed the Forum, the presentations by my government colleagues, and found the presentations by Dr. Kopelow and Steve Singer regarding ACCME very informative. The breakout sessions were the most valuable –the discussions animated and useful. Thank you again for the privilege of addressing the group.”—Gene Passamani, MD, Consultant, Division of Genomic Medicine, National Human Genome Research Institute
  • “Representing the Office of National Drug Control Policy at the ACCME Continuing Medical Education (CME) as a Bridge to Quality Accreditation Workshop provided me with a great opportunity to inform the health and education professionals developing CME’s for their medical staff on the Obama Administration’s 21st century drug policy, which emphasizes prevention, treatment, and early health innovations to reduce drug use and its consequences in America. During this session, topic areas addressed included the importance of educating the medical professions on the nuances of substance use disorders, prescription drug abuse, and proper opiate prescribing. As President Obama has noted, drug policy is a public health issue, not just a public safety issue. ACCME continues to be one of ONDCP’s strongest partners by championing important public health issues related to substance use disorders to the CME development field.”— June S. Sivilli, MA, Senior Advisor, Office of Demand Reduction, Office of National Drug Control Policy
  • "The ACCME Public Imperatives Forum provided a great overview of the learning opportunities available for the nation's practicing clinicians.  We applaud the ACCME for directing their focus to these important national priorities that will better prepare the workforce to collaborate toward better health and better care for lower overall cost. Through the use of health information technology, we can leverage the best evidence, the best measurement tools, and the best decision support tools to assist care providers in reaching these combined goals. By recognizing engaged clinicians who are actively learning and improving through the use of these tools, ACCME expands the model of continuing medical education well beyond the classroom – and into targeted learning that aligns with national priorities. We are transforming health care. Technology and education are both necessary and interdependent ingredients in this great transformation."‑Jacob  Reider ,MD, Chief Medical Officer of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was unable to attend, but sent this comment:

  • “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) commends the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education for its efforts to focus national continuing medical education on public health imperatives.” —Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH, Director, CDC

Here are comments from participants:

  • “The opportunity to hear from—and meet—the representatives of the federal government was a tremendous opportunity for me. It was really amazing to think that they were taking [time] from their busy schedules to speak with accredited CME providers. For me to be able to go back and tell the leadership of my institution that these government agencies want us to help address these public health problems is very empowering.”
  • “I was so inspired with the presentation regarding the teamwork approach to issues regarding addiction. As a matter of fact, during the presentation, I contacted a colleague in corporate communications with our health care facility to ask if he was aware of any programs addressing addiction. I have been developing an action plan since that moment! Thank you for encouraging CME coordinators/education specialists to get out of the offices and take their place at the roundtable of change.”
  • “Loved the government reps' presentations!! So relevant and helpful! My favorite quote from Dr. Reider: We can't impose change, but we can inspire it. His arguments for the 'meaningful use' of medical informatics were quite persuasive! Dr. Passamani was also outstanding! His discussion, in the breakout, about how to heighten awareness (of human genome science) was excellent.”

Photo
Federal government representatives discuss opportunities for CME collaboration at the "Public Health Imperatives Forum," held during the ACCME's 2013 CME as a Bridge to QualityTM Accreditation Workshop.  From left: Jacob Reider, MD, Chief Medical Officer of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC); June S. Sivilli, MA, Senior Advisor, Office of Demand Reduction, Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP); Wilson Compton, MD, MPE, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); Gene Passamani, MD, Consultant, Division of Genomic Medicine, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)